THE PERFECT ALTERNATIVE TO DEADLIFTS...

November 2, 2018

 

The 'Deadlift' is definitely one of the few single exercises that work the upper and lower body in the same movement, making it essential for all round fitness. Deadlifts are traditionally performed with a long olympic bar which not only takes up lots of space but can sometimes look a little intimidating to the regular gym user.

 

"Deadlifts... a little intimidating to the regular gym user"

 

Deadlifts are also a recognised competitive sport requiring lots of teaching points, unfortunately this leads to many of us afraid to try it on our own. It has a fairly high level of difficulty which potentially increases the risk of injury when practising without a trainer. Thats why kettle bell deadlifts is an excellent alternative!

 

The kettle bell deadlift offers the same benefits as the conventional deadlift but can be performed in a much smaller space. They also have fewer teaching points and no trainer is required. Beginners/intermediate level of gym enthusiasts will enjoy the same benefits from using kettle bells, so why not give it a shot! 

 

 

5 Reasons Why Deadlifting Using Kettle Bells Is Awesome!

 

1. Kettle bell deadlifts target your bum, legs, lower and upper back, arms, shoulders and core, making this exercise one of the most complete single movements you can do. 

 

2. Studies have shown that adding deadlifts to your workout will increase your all round strength because it targets the muscles at the front and the back of your body.

 

3. Deadlifts have also shown to improve your posture (when done correctly) because in order to perform the movement properly, your body must adapt to it's correct alignment.

 

4. When performing a deadlift you actually improve many aspects of training which include: - Muscular strength, Cardiovascular fitness (heart and lungs) Power, Fat loss, Calorie burn and Injury prevention.

 

5. Kettle bell deadlifts require very little space unlikethe conventional olympic bar deadlifts. This allows the exercise to be done in a much smaller area. No excuses guys!

 

             

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BEGINNERS: 

3 sets of 8 reps with 60-90 secs rest using 8-12kg kettle bells.

 

INTERMEDIATES:

4 sets of 12 reps with 60 secs rest using 14-20kg kettle bells.

 

 

Final Word:

So lets recap, Kettle bell deadlifts benefit everyone from your regular gym user to an elite athlete; they build muscle, increase your strength, prevent injuries and help correct your posture. They can be performed without taking up too much space, as kettle bells are quite small but very dense in weight! So overall they are one of the best movements you can do anywhere, not only at the gym. Massive thumbs up!

 

 

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References:

  • Escamilla, R. F., Francisco, A. C., Fleisig, G. S., Barrentine, S. W., Welch, C. M., Kayes, A. V., ... & Andrews, J. R. (2000). A three-dimensional biomechanical analysis of sumo and conventional style deadlifts. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 32(7), 1265-1275.

  • Thompson, B. J., Stock, M. S., Shields, J. E., Luera, M. J., Munayer, I. K., Mota, J. A., ... & Olinghouse, K. D. (2015). Barbell deadlift training increases the rate of torque development and vertical jump performance in novices. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 29(1), 1-10.

  • Chulvi-Medrano, I., García-Massó, X., Colado, J. C., Pablos, C., de Moraes, J. A., & Fuster, M. A. (2010). Deadlift muscle force and activation under stable and unstable conditions. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 24(10), 2723-2730.

  • Camara, K. D., Coburn, J. W., Dunnick, D. D., Brown, L. E., Galpin, A. J., & Costa, P. B. (2016). An examination of muscle activation and power characteristics while performing the deadlift exercise with straight and hexagonal barbells. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 30(5), 1183-1188.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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